The Mighty Bean

For the sake of simplicity, I’m going to refer to the family of legumes as “beans.” (Technically, all legumes are beans, but not all beans are legumes. I know, it’s confusing. If you want to study the difference, do an online search—it’s quite fascinating to learn!)

“Edamame Hummus”. . .I put equal parts of Garbanzo Beans and defrosted Edamame Beans in a food processor (bags of Edamame Beans may be found in the frozen vegetable aisle). Then I add the juice of one large lemon and about 1/3 cup of the liquid drained from the Garbanzo Beans, along with 3 cloves of garlic (diced), and 1 tablespoon of Mrs. Dash Southwest Chipotle seasoning. You may add Tahini or a ripe avocado, but I like to keep my hummus fat-free and add nuts or seeds for garnish instead.

“Edamame Hummus”. . .I put equal parts of Garbanzo Beans and defrosted Edamame Beans in a food processor (bags of Edamame Beans may be found in the frozen vegetable aisle). Then I add the juice of one large lemon and about 1/3 cup of the liquid drained from the Garbanzo Beans, along with 3 cloves of garlic (diced), and 1 tablespoon of Mrs. Dash Southwest Chipotle seasoning. You may add Tahini or a ripe avocado, but I like to keep my hummus fat-free and add nuts or seeds for garnish instead.

Not only are beans versatile in recipes, there’s such a variety of them that you could experiment with creating new recipes for days on end!

For instance, here’s just a few of them: Garbanzo Beans, Adzuki Beans, Anasazi Beans, Black Beans, Black-Eyed Peas, Butter Beans, Cannellini Beans, Cranberry Beans, Great Northern Beans, Kidney Beans, Lentils, Lima Beans, Mung Beans, Navy Beans, Pinto Beans, Soybeans, Split Peas, and Red Beans.

They are packed with protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. They also contain hardly any fat, no cholesterol, and they are loaded with calcium and iron. Additionally, they lower blood sugars after the next meal, and they’re excellent for good bacteria gut health.

However, I think one of the most fascinating elements about beans is they bind cholesterol in the digestive tract and facilitate its removal!

Whenever I’m cooking beans, after they’re done, I like to put a few cups of them into my dehydrator. I dehydrate them at 150 degrees for about five hours. They are perfect to pack for travel—they’re convenient, crunchy, and a wonderful addition to salads!

Whenever I’m cooking beans, after they’re done, I like to put a few cups of them into my dehydrator. I dehydrate them at 150 degrees for about five hours. They are perfect to pack for travel—they’re convenient, crunchy, and a wonderful addition to salads!

If you are in the habit of eating meat for every meal “to get your protein”. . .try substituting plant-derived protein instead! Your heart, kidneys, and arteries will thank you!

Here’s to your great health!


Emily Boller is author of Starved to Obesity (Post Hill Press, 2019).